YouTube Is Making Hard For the Copyright Holders to Make Unfair Claims Against The Creators Overall rating: ★★★★★ 5 based on 23 reviews
5 1

BlogSimplio Labs Blog

Once we accept our limits, we go beyond them.
Albert Einstein

YouTube Is Making Hard For the Copyright Holders to Make Unfair Claims Against The Creators

Uncategorized, What's New No Comment
youtube copyright claims

YouTube Company found that most of the copyright holders are using unfair means to take revenue away from the creators. The news appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

For most of the people, YouTube’s copyright system is a mess as it places the burden on the creators to dispute the copyright claims, in turn, the copyright holders use the manual claiming tool to seize revenue arising from the videos often before the YouTuber (creator) takes a chance to respond.

But now YouTube from continuous requests form the content creators is updating this tool so that creators do not face any loss. This shall take place in the mid of September and YouTube will do this by changing its Content ID policy, YouTube mentions this in their blog post that by doing so many of the copyright claims shall be cut down. In other words, the right holders will not be able to size money from the YouTube videos by filing any claim and especially when the video is registered in someone’s name and appears for a small period of time on the channel or appears in the background of certain video.

YouTube has now made it mandatory for the people who are filing copyright infringement claims to provide a timestamp for the exact part of the video or the video’s they are reporting. The company also states that they will revoke user’s access to the manual claims if they continuously fail to provide accurate manual timestamps. An advantage of timestamps is that the manual claim recipient will see the timestamp as indicated by other party/parties that will make it easy to find out which part of the video needs to be edited.

To solve this issue they can either dispute the claim or can alter the video by using YouTube’s updating editing tools. Other than this the creators can shut down or remove all sounds, they can even swap them out easily with one of the platforms free to use songs from their audio library.

YouTube has a database of files on which it scans the video uploads so as to find the audio and video matches through its Content ID technology. Any copyright infringement found automatically leads to automated content ID (it’s a video platform system that detects an upload uses another person’s intellectual property claims, then they can earn from it as well) claims.

YouTube believes that by doing so many of the manual claiming privileges of labels or other right holders that get continuously breached will be stopped.

The changes made by the company will only effect manual claims and will have no impact on music found automatically by YouTube’s Content ID system. The company states that since it was implemented it has cleared many claims and has paid many right holders an amount of dollar 3 billion a very big amount.

The company states that they will continuously design ways to improve the creator’s copyright experience without altering the rights of the copyright owners.